The rumor mill is buzzing and reggae stars are wondering. Julian Jones-Griffith the former manager of dancehall reggae singjay Mavado has he reggae social media world buzzing. Mavado’s former manager published a post on his blog entitled “The pitfalls of managing an artist with an unhealthy appetite for crack.”

At one point Jones-Griffith was the manager for the entire Bounty Killer lead “Alliance”. So it is not easy to figure out exactly which artist Jones-Griffith is talking about. Reggae fans are relying on certain hints sprinkled throughout the article and many has decided that Griffith-Jones is referring to Mavado. One hint, is that the artist is capable of fulling a venue with a capacity of 2,000 fans. Although Alliance artists like Busy Signal and Bounty Killer are capable of such a feat, other hints point to Mavado only.

In the post Griffith-Jones states that:

… but tonight I couldn’t think about cracking this crackhead’s head; I had to figure out how I was going to lure him out of that bedeviled chicken coop and get him on stage performing for 2,000 people in the next 45 minutes. And the venue was 2 hours away.

Many see the “bedeviled chicken coup” as referring to the gully and as we all know, Mavado is the “gully god”.

Fans further joked that Mavado’s hit song “I am on the rock” which was also sampled by rapper Jay-Z is an admittance to Mavado’s crack use.

“The pitfalls of managing an artist with an unhealthy appetite for crack.”

The shuffling noises emanating from the chicken coop in the back yard weren’t the familiar sound of fowl. Unfortunately the audible clucks were coming from a skin-and-bone crackhead tumbling from his high, scratching around for more. When crackheads burn out their supply they have a tendency to rummage around on the floor like a truffle hog; imaginary tiny white rocks convincing them they had dropped a piece somewhere that, if they could just find it, could fry their brain that little bit longer. I once lived on a council estate in North London where one of the floors was home to a heroin and crack spot. I would often come home late night to find some grubby, dazed junkie on his hands and knees by the garbage shoot next to the entrance, rifling through the piles of waste telling himself there was a rock for his pipe in there somewhere. They made for good target practice back then, but tonight I couldn’t think about cracking this crackhead’s head; I had to figure out how I was going to lure him out of that bedeviled chicken coop and get him on stage performing for 2,000 people in the next 45 minutes. And the venue was 2 hours away.

Julian Jones Griffith

18 Karat Reggae