Soap company Dove has apologized for a racially insensitive Facebook ad it said “missed the mark in representing women of color thoughtfully.”

The advertisement, apparently for some sort of soap but which has since been deleted, showed a black woman wearing a brown shirt removing her top to reveal a white woman in a lighter top. A third image shows the white woman removing her shirt to show a woman of apparently Asian descent.

On Saturday, Dove, which is owned by Dutch-British transnational consumer goods company Unilever, issued an apology on its Twitter page for the advertisement.

“An image we recently posted on Facebook missed the mark in representing women of color thoughtfully,” the apology read. “We deeply regret the offense it caused.”

On Facebook, Dove posted a similar statement, saying the feedback the company received from the image would help guide their decisions in the future.

“Dove is committed to representing the beauty of diversity. In an image we posted this week, we missed the mark in thoughtfully representing women of color and we deeply regret the offense that it has caused. The feedback that has been shared is important to us and we’ll use it to guide us in the future,” the statement read.

Unilever and Dove did not immediately respond to NBC News’ request for comment.

By Sunday morning, Dove’s Facebook and Twitter pages were filled with a litany of backlash from consumers.

A screenshots of the advertisement was first shared by American makeup artist Naomi Leann Blake, which went viral and was shared thousands of times on Facebook and Twitter.

So I'm scrolling through Facebook and this is the #dove ad that comes up…. ok so what am I looking at….

Posted by Naythemua on Friday, October 6, 2017

The now-deleted advertisement is not the first time Dove has come under fire for being perceived as racially insensitive. In 2011, a controversial ad showed three women standing in front of a wall designated in “before” and “after.”

The woman standing in front of the “before” image had dark skin, a woman in between had medium-toned skin and the woman in front of the “after” image was white.

Dove at the time clarified the ad’s intent in a statement from its PR team.

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